February

Believe it or not, it has been almost an entire year since I set off for Kenya. Within the past year, I have worked on a dude ranch in Colorado, visited friends in Paris, lived in New York and am now on the move to California to pursue my passion of photography. It has been an amazing year!

I must say though that not a day has passed where I have not thought about my time in Kenya. Maybe I’m obsessed, maybe I’m crazy, or maybe Kenya (the country, the people, the culture, etc.) impacted me in a way that I could have never imagined it to. For this one-year anniversary post, I would like to reflect on all the reasons why I miss Kenya but first I think it is important for me to continue where I left off on the blog because I left out an entire month’s (February) worth of incredible experiences. To keep organized and to keep this post from being a million pages long, I will write a separate post following this one of reflections.


February

I spent the majority of my February with Arrive in the small village of Nyaturubu in Keumbu. A lot happened this month, so this is going to be a long one..

We had a lot of visitors at Arrive!

_RAP6547_RAP6550 The two boys (pictured) that Brian is talking to were the first of our visitors. They are two street boys that walked a whole 11.5km (about 3-5 hour walk) barefoot all the way from Kisii town to our home in Keumbu. Word had gotten out on the street that the Keumbu Rehema Children’s Home (Arrive) is a pretty nice place to live and yeah it is, but unfortunately the home cannot support all of the street dwellers of the area as there is not nearly enough space. Brian respectfully interviewed the two boys. The older of the two did most of the talking. It was hard for me as an outsider to watch this interaction, not only because they were mainly speaking in kiSwahili but also because of the emotion built up in the younger, timid boy (he was wiping his tears away the whole time). Unfortunately, the older boy did not seem as if he were being honest with Brian and Brian had to ask the two to leave. It was not easy for Brian to tell children to go back to the streets (in fact, it’s extremely difficult for him to do) but again, there is not enough space to house all of the 200,000+ street dwellers of the area.

 I visited the kiddos at school!  _RAP6584 _RAP6609  

Duke, Enok, Brian and I took a field trip to visit Duke and Enok’s “homes” before Arrive. _RAP6746 _RAP6747 _RAP6748 _RAP6749 _RAP6752 _RAP6753 _RAP6793 _RAP6795 _RAP6812 I gave Duke and Enok each a camera to play around with for the day.  Watching them reintroduce themselves into their old terrain, clean and sober, was incredible and how they documented this experience on camera is even more amazing!

Brian and I took a weekend trip to Nairobi to visit Gretta.

Gretta works for General Electric and had been on assignment in Nairobi for some time. She has been a HUGE contributor to Arrive! One of her biggest accomplishments was in helping Arrive receive a grant from GE to build a running water system and fishpond. (both in which were installed in the Spring and look awesome!) While in Kenya, Gretta also had a whole bunch of authentic Kenyan bags and shoes made at a Nairobi marketplace to sell when she got back to the states as another way to fundraise for Arrive. Did I mention that she’s amazing!

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Pastor Robert, Mama Terry, Brian and I took a visit to Kisii town to do some back to school shopping for the girls going to secondary school. 

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Sylvia, Meir, Diana, Diana and Delphine the night before they left.

Sylvia, Meir, Diana, Diana and Delphine the night before their first day at school!

Sylvia labeling all her new supplies.

Sylvia labeling all her new supplies.

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not an easy goodbye for me..

not an easy goodbye for me..

..but the girls sure were excited!

..but the girls sure were excited!

Thanks to a few extremely kind people, five of the girls in the community (2 from the home) were able to go on to secondary school!

A couple weeks passed, and it was time for one of the greatest visits of them all! Max, my older brother, came to visit for my last two weeks in Kenya. I had just two weeks to show him how truly incredible Kenya is. I knew that that would not be hard, but that is not enough time to see everything.

I travelled into Nairobi the day before Max’s arrival to spend some time with some friends. I met up with Simon, Martin, and a couple of the other boys that I regularly hung out with while I was living in Nairobi. I almost instantly noticed that one of the boys that regularly meets with us, Kennedy, was missing. “Where is that little punk?” I had wondered and went on to ask. The boys told me that he was back on the street. He was having problems at home. My heart sunk. I almost instantly grabbed my phone, called Kelvo (good friend/taxi driver) and asked him if he could pick me up and help me find Kennedy. We both agreed that we would search for him the following day because it was getting late and was starting to rain. I’m not going to lie, I was pretty irritated. I wanted to go find him just at that very moment. I couldn’t fathom the idea of this  little guy sleeping in a dumpster. In reality though he had been sleeping on the street for some time (I had to keep telling myself at least) so one day more would not hurt.

After spending countless hours with the boys at the mall, I decided it was about time to get back to Winnie (my first host/where I stayed that night) so that I could eat dinner with her and catch up on things. I said my goodbyes to the boys and agreed to meet them the following day and then got on the bus. I was on the bus for less than a minute when it started up. While it was moving I heard a knock on the window to my right, I looked over and it was Kennedy! He saw me from a distance get on the bus. He wanted to say hi. I immediately got up from my seat and banged on the bus door and ordered the driver to stop the bus. I jumped off the bus while it was practically still moving and then ran over to hug Kennedy (regardless of the filth he was in). I could not help but start tearing up at the sight of him. From just looking at him, I could tell he was not doing well, at all. I sat him down to talk and he was high. He was unhappy. Above all things he was hungry. I called Winnie and postponed our dinner date for the following evening so that I could get Kennedy some food. I made an agreement with Kennedy: I would get him pizza if he came back and met me the next day, sober (I had nowhere to keep him that night). He agreed. We went into the mall to get pizza and boy can I tell you that that was an experience getting Kennedy as street kid into the mall. Now I have been to this mall several times before with Kennedy but never had I been there with him as a street kid. The mall security at “mzungu” malls despise street children (as some of them do try to steal/ torment the cops).  Generally, the security/cops will beat the kids if they even get close to the mall entrance. I had to practically hold Kennedy’s hand for them to allow me to take him inside.

Max’s Arrival Day

The next day rolled in. I went to the mall first thing in the morning to meet up with Kennedy. I waited and waited for a while and then he showed up! I was not expecting it but he came with a friend. Both boys were dirty! It was about time these two got cleaned up so the three of us went on a hunt through the streets of Kawanguare for some new clothes and shoes. After, we went on an even bigger hunt searching for a public shower where they could clean off in and then we went to get them haircuts.

Pre-Showers, haircuts, clotes, shoes.. L1080681 The receptionist at the public showers. What a genuinely nice woman she was. L1080685

Look at that swag!

Look at that swag!

After getting the boys cleaned up, we got lunch and hung out for some time. Then, I had to go get prepared for Max’s arrival that evening. It was too hard for me say goodbye to Kennedy that day so I didn’t. I had him meet me a couple of hours later for dinner and had him come pick Max up with me at the airport.

Kennedy's first time at an airport!

Kennedy’s first time at an airport!

Max arrived safe and sound! Kennedy was so excited to meet his “long lost brother” as he called Max. Kennedy spent the night with us at our hostel. The next day, was day one of our two week adventure.

Max’s Visit

Day One Nairobi

Long-lost brothers

Long-lost brothers

A visit to a Crocodile Farm.

A visit to a Crocodile Farm.

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Check that Ostrich egg out!

Check that Ostrich egg out!

Elephant Orphanage

Elephant Orphanage

_RAP7786 DSC01426 DSC01433       Giraffe Park

Kennedy, Max and Simon.

Kennedy, Max and Simon.

In the afternoon we met up with Brian to bring Max to Mlango Kubwa, a slum on the east side of Nairobi in Eastleigh (the dirtiest and most dangerous slum region in all of Nairobi) to show Max a less touristic, more “real” side of Kenya.

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Safari

On day two, we departed Nairobi and headed west. On the previous day both Brian and Max fell in love with Kennedy’s personality just as I had, and Brian decided there was no way he could go back to the street. “Kennedy’s coming home with us,” he said. Boy was I happy!  The four of us rode together to Narok (about 2hr30min from Nairobi) and then parted ways. Brian and Kennedy took another car further west towards the home in Keumbu while Max and I went on a safari in the Maasai Mara Reserve with the coolest safari guide, Mike Githari.

DSC01568_RAP7906 _RAP7914DSC01593 IMG_5710 IMG_5762 IMG_5893_RAP8033 _RAP8053_RAP8039 _RAP8150 _RAP8281_RAP8448_RAP8314 _RAP8473_RAP8498 After an incredible three-day safari, Max and I were introduced to some Maasai people and were invited into their village. The Maasai are a group of semi-nomadic people that are known for their distinctive customs and dress. What makes the the Maasai unique is how they stick true to many of there age-old traditions.

A traditional Maasai home. A hut covered in cattle dung for waterproofing.

A traditional Maasai home. A hut covered in cow dung for waterproofing.

IMG_5908_RAP8548 One tradition of the Maasai warrior is to kill a lion in order to enter the adult world. Above are Max and I wearing a lion skin hat with some Maasai warriors.

_RAP8556_RAP8561 _RAP8562IMG_5916 Another Maasai tradition is the Maasai warrior burns as a preparation for the pain and challenges they expect to endure throughout adult life. Warriors can not flinch while getting the burn.

_RAP8578 A traditional dance for Maasai warriors consists of a whole lot of jumping. The higher you can vertically jump as a Maasai, the stronger you are.

_RAP8585_RAP8567 The Maasai’s red clothing is also believed to stand for power.

Max has Arrived

After our safari, Max and I headed further west back home to Keumbu.  At this point, I do admit, I was really really missing the kids a lot! I was so excited for Max to finally meet them all! For his first day in Keumbu, we welcomed Max with a beautiful sunset hike and the following morning we went to visit the school.

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A visit to Emmanuel Light Academy.

A visit to Emmanuel Light Academy.

Then, we spent a day in Kisii to meet and hang out with some of the street kids. _RAP9226_RAP9227 _RAP9236_RAP9251 _RAP9279_RAP9360

Last night in Keumbu with Arrive.

What better way to celebrate Max’s and my last night in Keumbu than with the kid’s first ever bonfire, first ever s’mores and with some soda pop!

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Back to Nairobi

Back in Nairobi, Max and I went to visit Meta Meta Orphanage.

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Remember the shamba (garden) Biru and I helped plant 3 months prior?!

Remember the shamba (garden) Biru and I helped plant 3 months prior?!

Look how much it has grown!

Look how much it has grown!

Mombasa & Diani Beach  Max and I spent our last couple days on the Kenyan coast at a  backpackers hostel just south of Mombasa on Diani Beach.

DSC02264DSC02325DSC02348 Within no time, my four months in Kenya were over.. THE END of an experience of a lifetime! Thanks so much for following it with me! Until Next time! -N

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Masai Experience

Last week, we had two American fellow CU Buffs, Amy and Yazen, come and visit Arrive from Uganda where they are working at a Congolese refugee camp.

Within their one week stay, we took a two-day excursion to a small Masai village in the Great Rift Valley called Ewuaso.

During our short two days, we got a glimpse of the Masai culture, rode motorbikes through the rift valley, hung out with some Masai dudes, hunted for gazelle through the night and camped under the stars in the bush.

Though the trip was extremely short, it was quite the adventure!

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The girls are going to school!

Thanks to some very generous donors at home in the US both Diana and Sylvia, two very high-standing and deserving young ladies of Keumbu as well as Meir and Delphine, two of the girls from the Arrive home, will be going to high school as soon as next week!  Yesterday Pastor Robert announced this news to both the parents and children at the Emmanuel Light Academy (the primary school) and the whole town seemed to get the word and started parading the streets with joy!

Here are some of the photos Pastor and some of the Arrive children took of the celebration:

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After, a few of the girls and I went to Kisii for a Girl’s Day Out to celebrate.

Meir, Me, Delphine, Diana and Diana

Meir, Me, Delphine, Diana and Diana

It was such a great accomplishment finding such amazing people to support these young girls in such a short period of time! I can tell you firsthand from spending the entire day with them that they are beyond giddy for this opportunity they have been given! All of us at Arrive are also very excited to see the girls reach their biggest goals. I really cannot thank the donors enough for what you have done and are doing for them. However, we still have several more girls that are at the top of their class that do not have  the funds required to pay the school fees and to join the girls mentioned above in school. They are from extremely poor families but have the potential to be very rich one day. If you are looking for a great way to start off the new year, sponsoring a young girl to continue her education in school might be the way of doing it!

If you are interested in reaching out a hand and helping someone become the future of Kenya, there still are countless opportunities to do so and I would be more than happy to help you. Every little donation helps, a lot! Please email me, at nellelizabethpollak@gmail.com  for further details and for any questions you might have.

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Towels

Today, with some of the money that people kindly donated, I bought all of the kids at Arrive in Kenya towels so that they no longer have to air dry after bathing and swimming in the river. A big thanks to all of you that contributed!

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Kamau

The past week has been amongst one of the best weeks I have had in Kenya and maybe even of my life. Not only has my life changed dramatically but the life of a sweet young boy’s did as well. He has given up a harsh life of neglect and hunger and I have welcomed a new brother into my family as well as into the Arrive family.

It was back in the very beginning of November during one of my first weeks in Kenya while I was still volunteering at an orphanage in Nairobi when I first met Peter Kamau. Brian Ash who is a friend of mine from the University of Colorado and the Founder of the organization Arrive in Kenya was in Nairobi for a visit and invited me to join him to talk to some street children. Street children, as the name implies are children that live on the streets. They are boys and girls as young as 6 years old who are forced to live homeless, often orphaned, and abandoned in the streets because of the epidemic of HIV/AIDS, violence or abuse at home, and for many other reasons.

Brian’s organization, Arrive has a mission to restore hope for street children by giving them a home, an education and basic healthcare. (I am presently volunteering at Arrive.) Prior to the day I spent with Brian I hadn’t really talked with any street children before. In fact, I hadn’t really even been aware of the magnitude of this problem in Kenya at all. The guidebooks I read and the people giving me guidance in Kenya warned me to stay away from street children as “they are dirty, thieves and are sick”.

My preconception of street children changed even before I got out of the car to greet them that day. As we approached we could see that they were high from the fumes of the glue they had pressed to their lips and they were dirty from their life on the streets but they were just children as young as 8 years old; some even younger. I was appalled to see the conditions under which these youngsters were living.

The kids we met that day were very happy to have visitors. They swarmed around and asked us all sorts of questions. One kid in particular stood out. Although you could tell that this boy had a plastic bottle full of glue hidden under his sleeve and that his eyes were glazed he was still able to communicate properly and express humor, which indicated that, he probably wasn’t a heavy glue sniffer. He actually seemed ashamed of having to live on the street and kept his bottle of glue hidden. He introduced himself as Brian but later we found out his name is really Peter Kamau.

After the kids got a bit more comfortable with us, we asked them all sorts of questions such as their names, ages, and history to get a better sense of why they were on the streets. There are a variety of reasons why such children end up living on the streets. Some of them were pushed to the streets while some were pulled onto them. Many of the children that were pulled to the streets ran away from home and resorted to the streets due to lack of adequate attention and care at home. Many were victims of domestic conflicts and violence. Some kids had no choice as they did not have a home or parents. On the streets, many of these children picked up a strong addiction to huffing glue (which they call gum). On a daily basis, they inhale the fumes of glue out of small plastic bottles as a way of getting high/drunk. They do this to suppress pain, loneliness, fear, and hunger. ( These children don’t realize that they are harming their brains in one of the most intoxicating ways. ) Not only are they exposed to taking drugs such as the gum but they are also exposed to a variety of other things such as harassment, violence amongst themselves and towards others, sexual exploitation, loneliness and fear, physical and emotional abuse, neglect, starvation, and poor hygienic and sanitary conditions.

After about an hour of talking with the children we bought them some bread and milk to temporarily ease their hunger and then I headed home to Kangemi where I was then working. I could not stop thinking about those poor children fending for themselves on the streets. I really wanted to get them all off the streets but did not have the resources to do so.

About a month passed and I was still thinking about ways that I could help these children when Tammy, an American friend that I had met in Kenya, invited me to visit a feeding program for street children. The feeding program takes place once a week at a small church in an area of Nairobi called Kawangware. Before being fed by some church members, the children must listen to the pastor for about an hour in an attempt to motivate them.

When I arrived at the church to attend the feeding program it didn’t occur to me that this church was very close to where I had first met the children on the street with Brian a month earlier. Upon entering the small tin structure, I was happy to see about 10 to 15 young boys attending the program. It saddened me to see the condition they were in but I was impressed to see that they had made an effort and had actually come to the program. Again, one boy in particular stood out. The instant I entered the room I shared eye contact with this boy and we both started beaming. It was Kamau. He remembered me and we were both so delighted to be reunited! After seeing Kamau, I looked around and noticed that nearly all of the boys that I had met previously were there.

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I greeted all of the boys and spent some time with each and every one of them to get a sense of how they were all doing. Out of all of the boys, Kamau seemed like he was the most enthused and able to speak with me. We spent a lot of time together that day. We talked all about his ambitions. He told me all about how he wanted to go back to school and study. He wanted change in his life but didn’t have the means of doing it on his own. I could tell right off the bat that he was a very bright boy and I was very impressed by his life goals. He told me that he wants to be an engineer one day. After talking for some time Kamau grabbed my hand and got me up to dance. He and his friends were very excited to show off their dance moves to a mzungo (white person). We all danced for a while and shared some laughs. It was really a great day spent with Kamau.

Kamau.

Kamau.

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With friends.

With friends.

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It was very difficult for me to leave the feeding program that day. I wished I could have taken Kamau home to Kangemi with me that very day but I had nowhere for him to go. From that day on, not one day passed that I did not think about him. I worried about him as if he were my son. He had such an impact on me that I knew that I could not let this kid suffer life on the street much longer and decided to ask my friend Brian Ash to help. I thought who better to ask than Brian who has become the “street boy expert and savior”. I told Brian the whole story and sent him a video clip that I took of Kamau at the feeding program. Brian could also see the potential that I saw in Kamau and told me that I could bring him from Nairobi to Keumbu in western Kenya where the Arrive children’s home is located. I was scheduled to move to and start volunteering at Arrive in a few days and I was extremely excited at the possibility of Kamau living there.

A few days after arriving at Keumbu to start working at Arrive, Brian and I went back to Kawangware, Nairobi to see if we could find Kamau. He was easy to find. He was where we had seen him last time. I cannot even describe how happy I was to see him there because I knew that was the day he would be given the opportunity to have a home and go back to school. He seemed very excited to see us too. After spending some time talking to him we asked him if he wanted to come home with us. I will never forget the look on Kamau’s face. He was ecstatic. The best part of all was that his friends were so supportive. Rather than being spiteful and jealous of Kamau they were all so happy for him.

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We left Kamau that day with a promise of a new life. He had just one last test to pass. We told him to show up the following day on that street without the glue and ready to go to his new home. The next day Kamau was at the designated spot and ready to go.

It was time for him to throw away the smelly oversized fleece and ripped up jeans that he had been wearing for God knows how long. First, I brought him to the market to get an entire new set of clothes and shoes.

Next, I got him a bar of soap and had him take a shower. After, we visited a local salon to get him a haircut which only cost approximately one U.S. dollar. After getting new clothes, a shower, and a haircut, Kamau looked like a completely different person and it only took about an hour for this transformation to happen.

The last of Kamau's street life.

The last of Kamau’s street life.

Post shower with new clothes.

Post shower with new clothes.

Haircut.

Haircut.

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After we celebrated with some pizza and soda we then hopped in a matatu home to Keumbu. It was on the journey home when I really realized how remarkable an experience this all was. It was the moment when Kamau had rested his head on my lap and fell asleep when I realized what I had done. I had just “adopted” this young boy.

I can say with all of my heart that bringing Kamau home to Keumbu is probably the best thing I’ve done so far in my entire life and I could not be happier to now have him as a part of my family forever.

On the way "home".

On the way “home”.

As of today, Kamau has been in Keumbu for one week. He has adjusted extremely well. Ever since the boys showed him the ropes on his very first morning here, Kamau has been a brother figure to each and every one of them. Kamau’s days of scavenging for food, searching for a haven to sleep at night and of unsanitary practices in the streets are all in the past now. He is now fed three healthy meals a day, has his own bed to sleep in, his very own clothes, a school uniform, and most importantly a family to support and take care of him. Keumbu has been a really great place for him as it is hundreds of miles away from the hustle bustle of the city and of the horrific street life he was subjected to in Nairobi. He is now enjoying a very peaceful life in a small rural town of green, lush fields to play and hike. One of Kamau’s favorite things to do since coming to Keumbu has been going on evening hikes to watch the sunset. It has become a sort of ritual for us to do each night with all the rest of the boys. After just four days off of the streets, Kamau has gone back to school and has impressed all of us with his immense knowledge. His smile, which is extremely contagious hasn’t left his face since he has arrived.

On a hike.

On a hike.

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One day Kamau told me once again that he really wants to become an engineer and I told him when you are a leading engineer you better be there to help me. We both laughed and he agreed.

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Kamau’s story is just one of thousands of stories of street children in Kenya. If you would like to help get more of the deserving children off of the street and into school, please visit www.arrivekenya.org or email arriveinkenya@gmail.com.

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First Day of Classes

Tuesday was the first day of official classes at the Emmanuel Light Academy.

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Morning at the Emmanuel Light Academy and Afternoon at the Recording Studio

On January 6 I spent the morning at the Emmanuel Light Academy – the school that both Pastor Robert and Mama Terry run and at which I will be helping teach. It was a really relaxed morning since school had not officially started yet. It was just a cleaning day to prepare for the new school year. Since there were no official classes being held it was a good time to better get to know the children.

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In the afternoon Brian, Wilfred (a local Kisii performer), Justin (one of the boys from the home) and I went into Kisii to meet up with a producer at a recording studio to produce a beat for a rap song that Justin wrote about his life as a street boy and how he has been saved and his hope is restored. It was really sweet to see the process of music production here. It did not take long at all for this producer guy to produce a really amazing beat. It was also really amazing to see a boy that not long ago was living on the streets getting the opportunity to chase his dream of becoming a musician. After producing the beat we even had the time to record the song. So we called up two of the girls from the home to come sing the chorus and within the few hours we were there – we had the song Justin wrote produced, recorded and burned to a CD.

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After a long day at the studio we headed back home and made some guacamole and chapatti and had a delicious dinner.

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I’ve ARRIVEd in Keumbu

On Saturday January 4 I packed up my things and moved to the next chapter of my time in Kenya. I took an approximately six-hour matatu ride from Nairobi west to Keumbu, a small rural area just outside the city of Kisii in Western Kenya.

I came to Keumbu to volunteer at my buddy from CU Brian’s non-profit organization called ARRIVE in Kenya. To learn more about ARRIVE, please visit the website http://www.arriveinkenya.org. ARRIVE’s primary goal is to restore hope to vulnerable children. These children have previously been abandoned to live homeless in the streets of Kenya. “The children Arrive rescues immediately move from a life of drug addiction, starvation, and homelessness to one of hope and opportunity.”

I reached Keumbu at around 4 pm. Brian welcomed me with some sugar cane, which is abundant here, and brought me back to the home. Everyone was very welcoming upon my arrival at the home and especially the children. The home is really beautiful! Pastor Robert and Mama Terry are the heads of the household. They both are such kind people and made me feel at home almost instantly.

After getting comfortable at the home and meeting all the 23 boys and 9 girls that live here, Brian took me on a tour of the place and then a short hike to watch the sunset over the tea fields. It truly was stunning!

The following day was Sunday and we attended the local church where Pastor Robert preaches. The service was lovely. It was full of song and dance. After church, Brian brought me to Kisii to show me the city for the first time and to meet some of the street children. It is amazing how Brian is like a celebrity in Kisii. All of the kids flock to him. He is truly doing incredible work here.

Dancing at the church.

Dancing at the church.

Kisii Markets.

Kisii Markets.

After visiting Kisii, we headed back to the home. At the home, we hung out for a while. Then, Brian and the girls brought me to show me where we get our clean water from and we collected water for the home.

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Attempt at stirring the massive pot of Ugali with my new buddy, Justin.

Attempt at stirring the massive pot of Ugali with my new buddy, Justin.

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Christmas and New Years

For the holidays, I travelled by car with my French buddy Jeremie and his French roommates Fred, Jeremy, and Nicholas back to the coast. The car trip which usually takes close to 7 hours took us about 13 hours due to traffic but it wasn’t terrible because I was with good company. We reached our hostel at Diani Beach around 7pm on Christmas Eve, just in time for a Christmas dinner and a present exchange. On Christmas Eve, we all went out and celebrated for Christmas and we used Christmas day as a day of rest on the beach.

Between Christmas and New Years we spent a lot of time chilling on the beach, which was extremely relaxing. On one of the days we took a small boat out into crocodile infested waters to an awesome sand bank and then over to a small island called Funzi Island. For New Years we all went to a giant party on the beach which hosted thousands of people. It was loads of fun! We hung out on the beach for the New Year to watch the sunrise and then headed back to the hostel for yet another day of rest. On January 2nd early in the morning we headed back to Nairobi.

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Everyone from the hostel in front of the pool before the big New Years party at the beach.

Everyone from the hostel in front of the pool before the big New Years party at the beach.

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Tea Plantation Tour on Horseback

Shortly after our trip to Ethiopia, Alex and I went on a tea plantation tour on horseback in an area just outside of Nairobi. It was great being back in the saddle again! It was also really nice to be in an area away from the hustle bustle of the city for a little. The ride was about an hour long through the tea fields.

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